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How Do Trees Affect The Water Cycle?

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Once the water enters the ground, they will either become surface runoff (overland flow), seep into the ground and become groundwater flow or be taken up the trees. Both surface runoff and groundwater flow will follow the contours of the land and emerge into rivers or seas.

The water taken up by the plants will be used in photosynthesis and respiration and this is a significant amount, considering the number of trees present in a forest. The water will eventually be passed out from the leaves of the plants as water vapour. This can be influenced by the amount of light received, the intensity of the light received, the humidity levels, temperature and so on.

Plants also help to bind soil and prevent erosion and landslides from occurring during heavy downpours. Trees, in tropical rainforests, for example, provide a thick canopy which would intercept the rainfall, allowing it to flow down the trunk as trunkflow. This 'softens' the impact of the rainfall and the shade provided by the undergrowth of shrubs and ferns will also intercept and lower the velocity of the rain drops.
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It effects the water cycle because the carbon dioxide in the air is depleted, causing an uprooting in the solar flares.
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The layers of trees in the forest protect the soil from the full force of rain. The water simply flows to the soil which trees help keep in place. Then there is less runoff and our water is cleaner.

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